• Facebook
  • Twitter

Do you ever walk into a movie theater (when there isn’t a global pandemic going on) and ask yourself, “What is the purpose of this movie I’m about to see?” I don’t, because, regardless of which movie I go to watch, my answer is always entertainment. I watch movies to be transported to another world in which I am inspired and momentarily freed from my daily burdens. The purpose of me even going to the theater or picking up a Blu-ray at Redbox or logging into Netflix is to have a good time. Because I’m the customer, it’s not my job to figure out the movie’s message. 

When I watch a Christian movie, however, I find myself wondering if this question was asked by the people whose job it is. You know, the filmmaker? I wonder if the people involved with the film have asked not just “Why do we want to make a movie?” or “What message do we want people to hear?” but “Why are we telling this story?” Knowing the answer to this question would help them connect with their audience, maybe even in a lucrative way, which is, of course, what studios are looking for. Studios see numbers: time signatures, headcounts, and dollar signs. They want to invest in art. While money is part of the motivation of the people making the movies, they (hopefully) also see moviemaking as a chance to express themselves creatively and in an impactful, lasting way. 

I’ve noticed that all filmmakers tend to imbue their films with their personal beliefs to some extent; however, the movies I’ve found most compelling are not the ones with the obvious bends in their messages. The movies that have had the biggest impact on me are the ones that inspire us as viewers to think for ourselves and arrive at our own conclusions. If you’re a filmmaker who prioritizes a message over telling a good story, chances are you’re making a propaganda piece. Chances are you’re not achieving either objective.

The Christian movie company Pure Flix has a mission statement: “To impact the global culture for Christ through media.” This is a mission I respect. Media is a huge part of our daily lives at this point in human history, so it’s natural for everyone to want a media presence. Media is a modern conduit by which we can communicate our thoughts, lives, and experiences. I’ve found that how we choose to communicate those ideas through media is where its value lies.

When I look at the way Pure Flix carries out their mission – quickly and cheaply – I’m less inclined to support them.  After all, wouldn’t their high-value message be better communicated if they gave their movies the creative love and attention they deserved? Film incorporates numerous sensational and artistic talents to communicate and inspire a range of emotions and ideas within us. If “inspiration” is a touchstone of our faith, then why is it so lacking in our films?  It feels like most Christian filmmakers prioritize selling a message over telling a story, leaving us with lackluster visual sermons rather than entertaining movies.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

On top of that, Christian movies often give mixed signals about who their target audience is. Is it a shotgun approach, spraying ideas in as many directions possible with the hopes of eventually hitting a target, or is the confusion unintentional? Maybe they do understand their target audience and are bending over backward to cater to the audience that pays. While they choose to play it safe for their older, conservative Christian audiences (many of whom are their financial backers), they often still claim that their movie’s aim is evangelism. But, if their target audience is Christians, then aren’t these movies preaching to the choir? They validate the believer while alienating the purported target. My non-Christian friends won’t willingly watch a Christian movie, and some countries won’t even allow explicitly Christian content within their borders.

I don’t think it’s wrong to create content for Christians, but if movie makers are pushing audiences to support these films for evangelistic purposes, I can’t help but feel that the audiences aren’t getting their money’s worth. And, if the content is specifically made for Christians, wouldn’t it be more beneficial if it inspired them and challenged them to grow? Otherwise, even though the movies are clean, they offer empty calories. Where’s the benefit? 

I know that creating challenging content is a financial risk; if you press too many buttons, your customers and backers will leave you. The Christian audience seems to be both undiscerning and picky at the same time. I think this is why the Christian movie industry is caught in a cycle of playing it safe, even though we as Christians are called to live fearlessly. 

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

So, then, what can Christian filmmakers do? As a creative writer, I stand by the importance of telling a good-quality story. As a Christian, I don’t want our half-baked movies to push others away from the faith or leave fellow believers complacent. I especially don’t want Christian filmmakers to default to the familiar out of fear of low returns. We as Christians are called to walk by faith. I strongly believe that the purpose of Christian movies should be to utilize our God-given artistic abilities to captivate, challenge, and inspire viewers. I encourage Christian studios and filmmakers to reevaluate the purpose of their movies and to place a higher value on creativity.

Cover Photo by Jakob Owens on Unsplash, Pastor Photo by Tye Doring on Unsplash, and Jumping Photo by Sammie Vasquez on Unsplash.

Lilia Cosavalente

Writer and Social Media Guru

Wordsmith and songbird. Wife and dog mom.
Strong advocate for creative excellence.
Check out her latest posts!

4 Comments

  1. Bella
    • Facebook
    • Twitter

    I yearn to create my own films one day with my own artistic touch. I was intially inspired by Japanese films and animation (otherwise known as anime) but soon I was engulfed in the wonderful world of creative arts. From live action to short films to anime and K-drama it was diverse and engaging altogether. At the time I did not realize just how powerful the force of creativity was and how it could impact society, faith, morals, and much more. When I grew older, my belief mingled into my creative outputs and I dove head first into film, animation, art, music, dance any form of art you can name I was all there. It was fascinating watching the products of hours upon hours of tiresome work and painstaking effort coupled with years of repetitive practice and studying all bundled up in a 3 minutes 3D short film. It was around that time when I was inspired to try and do the exact same hing but for the Lord. Years down the road and I’m still learning but I want to show the whole world just how a creative, ingenius, awesome a God I serve.

    Reply
    • Lilia Cosavalente
      • Facebook
      • Twitter
      • Facebook
      • Twitter

      Thanks for the comment, Bella! I have to admit I enjoy anime myself. 😀 I’m so glad you’re pursuing the creative arts and want to use them for God! Keep challenging yourself to grow and your work will inspire many.

      Reply
  2. Kyle Morgan
    • Facebook
    • Twitter

    Great article! Pure Flix reminds me a lot of Tyler Perry. He can create high quality work when he wants to (some of the House of Payne episodes are hilarious and touching at the same time) but more often than not, he sells quantity over quality. He knows he can make more money off of selling 3 mediocre films, than gamble on 1 great film. Every once in a while, Pure Flix will make a great film. Some examples are Case for Christ, God’s Not Dead: A Light in the Darkness, Mom’s Night Out, and even some of their earlier work. Hidden Secrets and What if… show care, and bold storytelling. But now that they distribute films, they have become more like Netflix where they try to buy and create as much content as possible. Earlier, the company made direct to dvd movies, and their bread and butter was churches who had a monthly subscription to show their films. I think this is where they became more focused on quantity over quality. But with the bar being constantly raised in Christian films, I think you will see Pure Flix and other companies slowing down, and taking their time. Hopefully!

    Reply
    • Lilia Cosavalente
      • Facebook
      • Twitter
      • Facebook
      • Twitter

      Thanks for the comment, Kyle! Good observations. I, too, hope they slow down and really invest in the craft of storytelling.

      Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Six Say SpookyNight Kevin Reviews!

As temperatures drop and leaves fall, spooky movies await our watching. As we enter October, check out Kevin’s six Say SpookyNight Reviews from years prior. Keep an eye on his YouTube channel for this year’s additions!

5 Action-Packed Say Goodnight Kevin Bibleman Videos!

Need more superhero content? Watch Kevin’s assortment of Bibleman videos!

SegaNight Kevin – 5 Gaming Streams!

Say Goodnight Kevin plays videogames?! Yes, he does! Don’t worry – they’re not only Sega games.

Breakthrough | Say MovieNight Kevin

Come with Kevin as he takes a look the faith film, Breakthrough. Starring Topher Grace, Chrissy Metz, Josh Lucas, Mike Colter, Dennis Haysbert. Like a TON of famous people. But are all those famous people enough? Find out in this awesome review!

4 Fan-Favorite Say Movienight Kevin Reviews

New to SayGoodnightKevin, or still catching up on his Movienight reviews? He has so many to choose from, sometimes it’s overwhelming to know which to watch next! These fan-recommended favorites are a great place for you to jump in.

Top 5 Say Romance Movienight Kevin Reviews

You’ll enjoy Kevin’s take on popular Christian romance movies. You know, the Hallmarky ones, with the cardboard cutout male leads and weird Christian dating theories.

New Veggie Tales is Coming this Christmas

Veggie Tales is kicking off their new show this Christmas with a Christmas themed episode. The trailer is out and Kevin takes a look at it in this very video! How does it look? Find out!

Lions and Disney and Remakes, Oh My!

Old or new Lion King? That is the question. Check out our takes on why sometimes the old is best.

Aladdin 2019: But Like….Why? (Is it as good as the original?!)

I finally saw Aladdin 2019. Since the original is one of my favorite movies of all time, I thought it was only fitting to share my thoughts. Does it hold up. Is it as good as the original? (no) Find out more in this video!

Toy Story 4 Is Finally Here, But Is It Good?!

One of Kevin’s favorite movies is all three Toy Story movies! So how does the forth installment hold up? Find out, as he shares it ALL!

Cyrus Nowrasteh: Infidel Director
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Cyrus Nowrasteh: Infidel Director

Episode Summary Cyrus Nowrasteh, the director of Infidel, Young Massiah, and many more great films that span over a decade, joins Kevin to talk about the making of his latest film and the true events that inspired it. Thank you to morethanonelesson.com for connecting...

Six Say SpookyNight Kevin Reviews!
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Six Say SpookyNight Kevin Reviews!

As temperatures drop and leaves fall, spooky movies await our watching. As we enter October, check out Kevin’s six Say SpookyNight Reviews from years prior. Keep an eye on his YouTube channel for this year’s additions!

Six Say SpookyNight Kevin Reviews!

As temperatures drop and leaves fall, spooky movies await our watching. As we enter October, check out Kevin’s six Say SpookyNight Reviews from years prior. Keep an eye on his YouTube channel for this year’s additions!

Explore!

Youtube
Say Movie Night Kevin
Podcast
Bargain Bin
Articles
Economic Soapbox
Trailer Reactions
Opinion Pieces
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Premium content and more!

Email Sign Up!

Become a Moon Colony Participant

Learn more…

.
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
Share This